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Application Process Engineering Subject

Alice’s Application Process

What made you want to study abroad?

When I competed in robotics abroad, I saw how students in other countries were encouraged to put in their time and effort in something they truly love. They learned knowledge beyond what is taught at school and applied what they learn in the real world. I really admired their enthusiasm and courage to make their dreams reality, and decided that I wanted to earn my college education in that kind of environment. 

What’s the toughest part for you during the entire application process?

Definitely the essays. It was extremely difficult to write an intriguing story that still reflected my true experiences. As a student from a public high school, I also didn’t have as much experience in writing. However, I think there are plenty of resources out there, you just have to know where to look. 

Here are some resources that really helped me build up my personal statement:
College Essay Essentials, by Ethan Sawyer; 50 Successful Harvard Essays; 50 Successful Ivy League Application Essays (link); The College Essay Guy Website (link)

What do you think helped you the most?
For me, it was asking someone close to me to review my essays (ie. my mom and sister.) College counselors or upperclassmen may know how to write a good essay, but they don’t know who you are. When my family reviewed my essays, they could really tell what topics fit me and the prompt the most, and they were able to provide comments that still reflected my identity. So I’d really advise people to ask their close friends, family, or teachers to review their essays, instead of going after expensive essay editors.

What are some things you think you did well during the application process?
Personal Statement: I had to revise my personal statement over and over again, ultimately rewriting it a week before the regular decision deadline, the one thing I’m most grateful for doing. The final version of my personal statement was something that truly represented who I am, what I’ve done, and what I dream of doing.

Interview: After 3 to 4 interviews, I gradually developed an SOP for interviews. One, prepare three reasons why I want to attend this school. Two, prepare three questions for the interviewer. Three, prepare one interesting experience I had in case I encountered a question I can’t answer on the spot. These simple preparations saved me from awkward silences. 

What’s the most regretful thing you’ve done during the process? What would you do differently?
Applying early action to my two favorite schools and not applying early to a safety school. This was a bad decision because my essays were pretty awful in my early applications. I wasn’t so familiar with interviews either. I ended up getting rejected EA from my two favorite schools and no acceptances from my safety schools. So for regular decisions, I basically applied everywhere thinking I wasn’t going to get accepted anywhere. If I could go back in time, I would start my essays early and apply to only one dream school. I would also apply early to one safety school, so that I have at least a safety net while applying for regular decisions.

One other thing I regret is not being proactive enough. If I could go back in time, I would tell myself that you can get accepted to your dream school, you just have to put in 100% of your effort. 

What do you think sophomore, junior and senior students should do right now?
Sophomores: Find activities you’re really interested in, and be committed.
Juniors: Take the SAT!!! Start going to college information sessions and build up your college list. You’ll find that there are a lot more schools out there, and more than one school is perfect for you.
Seniors: Write essays, prepare for interviews, draft resumes and create portfolios. Also, stop worrying and refreshing your portal. You’re going to be fine as long as you put in your best effort and believe in yourself 🙂

Alice Chen,
Columbia University ’24

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Uncategorized

About Alice

Hi! I’m Alice Chen. I graduated from Taipei First Girls High School in 2020, and I am now studying at Columbia University SEAS majoring in Computer Science. My dream is to use my love for coding to make the world a better place, though I’m still figuring out on the how. Other than working on my programming projects all day, I also enjoy eating strawberries and binge-watching movies. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me here: alicetingchen@gmail.com

Alice Chen,
Columbia University ’24

Categories
Application Process Economics Philosophy Political Science Subject

Charlotte’s Application Process

What made you want to study abroad?

I’ve always wanted to study political science throughout my whole life. However, knowing that politics is not a well-developed and valued academic field in Taiwan, I made up my mind to study abroad so that I can be exposed to a more ideal education where poli sci is more than just “the politics in the government.” It is, in fact, a fascinating and interesting major to explore. 

What’s the toughest part for you during the entire application process?

Only a few people applied to British colleges in Taiwan, and I basically knew none of them. So I had to figure out how to make a proper application all by myself. The process is really different from US college applications. 

What do you think helped you the most?

It was a stressful time, and I wouldn’t get through it without support from my classmates and peers who were also applying abroad. We prepared for exams, did research on applications, and brainstormed our essays together. 

What are some things you think you did well during the app process?

For the UK, it is really helpful to demonstrate your academic interest and knowledge in the field you are applying to. My extracurriculars are mostly politics related, so I could show to the colleges my profound interest in politics through formulating a good personal statement. 

What’s the most regretful thing you’ve done during the process? What would you do differently?

I think I should’ve been more diligent in preparing for my SAT, or at least study smarter rather than just dive myself into loads of textbooks and practice questions. 

What do you think soph, junior, senior students should do right now?

Soph: focus on your GPA, and start searching for opportunities that you are interested in. 

Junior: put yourself out there, cherish any chance you can have. Most importantly, start preparing for SAT (and start taking it at the second half of your soph year) and possibly subject tests. 

Senior: reflect on yourself everyday: is there something special in my life, or at least has significant meanings, that you can  put in your essays/personal statement. Relax if you need to since life is especially hard this year.

Charlotte Lee, King’s College London ’23

Categories
Economics King's College London Philosophy Political Science School Subject

King’s College London

Why did you choose this school?

King’s College London (KCL) is the school with the best social science department in London, and is ranked just behind Oxford and Cambridge University. It is located at the heart of London, and is filled with all varieties of internship opportunities. It is less theoretical than London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and the atmosphere in KCL is much more alive than any other prestigious Universities in London. 

What is your favorite thing about your school?

PPE is located at Strand Campus, the oldest and the most marvelous campus out of all four King’s campuses. It is reconstructed from a classical castle beside the well-known Thames River, so people can view the Big Ben and the London Eye clearly. The libraries open 24hrs and are equipped with new facilities. 

What is the best memory studying at your college?

During the winter, there will be an ice-skating field right next to the campus I’m studying at. My friends and I usually go skating every once in a while, and have hot chocolate (sometimes hot wine) afterwards.

Do you think it’s worth it?

For me personally, yes. Studying in KCL provides me with excellent learning experiences and an exciting social life. I enjoy the weekly discussions which have given me plenty of insights that I’ve never thought of before. The cultural diversity of KCL has also guided me to understand more cultures and to perceive issues from different perspectives. Moreover, since KCL is at the heart of central London, the night life, including bars and clubs, never ends. KCL even holds parties at nightclubs and cruises for students. Therefore, if you are seeking a college experience in which you can immerse yourself into an in depth learning process, and at the same time enjoy yourself to the utmost: KCL is your choice. 

Charlotte Lee, King’s College London ’23

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Uncategorized

About Charlotte

I’m Charlotte Lee, currently doing my second year of Politics, Philosophy, and Economics (PPE) in King’s College London. PPE is an interdisciplinary program that is especially provided by British higher education system, and it not only contains individual studies of each subject, it also provides inter-connected modules between these wonderful fields of studies. It’s also a great pathway to a law career. PPE allows you to experience all kinds of varieties unlike pure law, but at the same time equips you with profound capabilities for future studies or jobs. 

I graduated from Taipei First Girls High School in 2019 doing the Social Science and Humanity Talented Program, specialized in civics education. Although it might seem rare and unconventional for a Taiwanese public high school students to proceed to a British university, I sincerely believe that the United Kingdom is a brilliant place for higher education, especially for the ones who wish to major in fields such as social science or humanities subjects. 

I’m strongly interested in the studies of International Relations and Political Science (an ex-MUNer who has been chairing over 10 conferences, both internationally and domestically). I aspire to be in service for international governmental organizations or Taiwanese domestic government. I’m also enthusiastic about writing articles regarding political affairs and conducting political analysis. To fulfill my enthusiasm, I formed a media platform, the Mockingjay, for those who share the same interest as me to publish their articles. 

I’m a cat-lover and is currently devoted with all my heart to Lily, the little cat princess in my home. I enjoy political discussions and debates for day, and drinking for night. 

Contact:

FB: Charlotte Lee

IG: heyimcharley

Charlotte Lee, King’s College London ’23

Categories
Application Process Biology Subject

Evie’s Application Process

What made you want to study abroad?

The opportunities, the flexibility of quite literally choosing your own career, and the open-question type of education.

What’s the toughest part for you during the entire application process?

Mapping out what admission officers might find special while staying true to self. Being authentic can be extremely difficult but also the most crucial when you are trying to stand out among thousands.

What do you think helped you the most?

Taking necessary breaks when writing essays is the way to go. Instead of aimlessly burying yourself in endless sessions of typing, having a clear mind will most definitely give you a different (and better!) approach to your writing. 

What are some things you think you did well during the app process?

When I was choosing which school to apply early to, I found myself struggling between the choice of a mediocre school and Stanford. Since the odds of getting into Stanford was so low, I didn’t want to risk wasting my time over its application- I was intrigued by the idea of applying to a mediocre school and getting in early to save both time & money. Eventually, I convinced myself to take a leap and forget the outcome.

What’s the most regretful thing you’ve done during the process? What would you do differently?

I would’ve started my standardized testing more early. I ended up squeezing my second SAT and my 2 SAT Subjects into senior year, which piled up to the existing stress of writing essays, etc. 

What do you think soph, junior, senior students should do right now?

sophomore: 1) keep up with your grades for each and every subject- including the ones you think don’t matter, they matter! 2) if you already have a passionate field, go towards it; if you don’t, start exploring. 3) participate, participate, participate- you will certainly get something out of every experience 4) start TOEFL/SAT/ACT preparation

Junior: 1) put in full effort for both academics and extracurriculars- it’s not gonna be easy, but give it your best. 2) take the standardized testing for the first time at least. 3) start looking into different colleges.

senior: 1) take any last minute testing. 2) keep the gpa up 3) find recommenders, build a college list, brainstorm essays.

Evie Chen, Stanford ’24

Categories
Biology School Stanford University Subject

Stanford University

Why did you choose this school?

Besides the obvious- prestige, gorgeous campus, and enviable climate- there’s also the welcoming, inclusive atmosphere, top-tier location, and passionate faculty. Although having rigorous academics, with the school being an hour drive from downtown San Francisco and near some renowned skiing paradise (Lake Tahoe, etc.), student life should not be boring at all! 

What is your favorite thing about your school?

From what I’ve been through, I’d definitely say the faculty and how much effort they put in to make the online learning experience the best they could. Their enthusiasm to eagerly share what they know is almost tangible. 

What is the best memory studying at your college?

Honestly, I haven’t experienced a lot besides Zoom classes and online meetings, but the one thing I look forward to experiencing is the football games and just the residential life in general (having roommates, etc.)! 

Do you think it’s worth it?

Even with online classes, I’d say definitely! With the “Stanford” title, the school often invites big name speakers and hosts events with them. The flexibility of the curriculum* is luxury to me, growing up with a standard curriculum fixed by the Education Bureau. The variety of classes grant clueless people like me an opportunity to explore interests. The (surprisingly) non-judgemental student body offers me, a non-native English speaker, an encouraging atmosphere to speak up. 

*I know people who literally designed their own major, including the courses requirements and everything! Flexible is an understatement.

Evie Chen, Stanford ’24

Categories
Biology School Stanford University Subject

About Evie

Hello! I’m Evie Chen, a freshman at Stanford University and graduated from Taipei First Girls’ High School in June 2020. My interest (currently :D) lies in the field of cognitive science and aim to do research on babies’ behavior and addiction. Aside from academics, I am obsessed with music, ethical shopping, and anti-plastic movements. As cliché as it sounds, I aspire to make a difference in society– in what way I’m still uncertain, but aren’t we all here to figure this out? Feel free to reach out (eviechen91@gmail.com) to talk about college applications- ask away!

Evie Chen, Stanford ’24